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91
Religion and Philosophy / Re: Christian News Network fundies
« Last post by Bob J. on July 19, 2017, 03:31:43 am »
568 comments in the thread?? THIS is what gets them the most heated? Arguing about theology?


NX-01? ...weeeeeeeeeeell...

And over on this thread there are 80 odd comments concerning which Bible should be used.
http://christiannews.net/2017/07/16/southern-baptist-owned-lifeway-stores-wont-pull-message-bible-after-authors-gay-marriage-retraction/
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Religion and Philosophy / Re: Christian News Network fundies
« Last post by CrowFood on July 19, 2017, 03:23:14 am »
568 comments in the thread?? THIS is what gets them the most heated? Arguing about theology?

This would be like if I ignored threads about law and politics but stayed up all night arguing about whether the Death Star could beat the Enterprise.
Shit like this is why I left the faith. This just happens to be what they show. I'm willing to put down money, and good money, that this kind of thing is common at their churches. Hell, it's common in a lot of them. I remember a pastor of mine got his pay slashed by the church because, get this, he had a sermon about Passover on Passover and people were asking if they were Passover Christians now. The bickering, backstabbing, and constant pressure to adhere to the various doctrines of faith is both exhausting and disheartening.

And it depends on which Enterprise. UCC-1701 of any variety? They'll find a way to science it.

NX-01? ...weeeeeeeeeeell...
93
Politics and Government / Re: I didn't know Australia had second-class citizens
« Last post by dpareja on July 19, 2017, 02:48:38 am »
So if someone happens to be born as a dual Australia-US citizen (born on US soil to Australian parents, say), they have two citizenships through no fault or choice of their own, the non-Australian citizenship being very hard to be rid of, but who was raised in Australia and has no memories of being in the US (say the mother went into unexpected labour while on vacation), you're fine with that person being ineligible to serve in Parliament?
Well, yes, actually. For starters, while it would be great if we had an accurate and reliable system for vetting the eligibility of any would-be candidates based on their individual experiences, that's not even remotely feasible. So yes, while some dual nationals who are genuinely indifferent to their second citizenship may get unfairly barred from running for office, keeping out those who in any way aren't and can therefore be influenced by their second country's government is a touch more important. Again, I know it sucks for some people, but I really don't see any way to have it both ways.

And, to me, that's a matter for voters to determine. I'd have no issues with candidates having to be up-front about their other citizenships if they have them, but if their voters decide that they're OK with their representative having another citizenship, then that's their choice to make.
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So if someone happens to be born as a dual Australia-US citizen (born on US soil to Australian parents, say), they have two citizenships through no fault or choice of their own, the non-Australian citizenship being very hard to be rid of, but who was raised in Australia and has no memories of being in the US (say the mother went into unexpected labour while on vacation), you're fine with that person being ineligible to serve in Parliament?
Well, yes, actually. For starters, while it would be great if we had an accurate and reliable system for vetting the eligibility of any would-be candidates based on their individual experiences, that's not even remotely feasible. So yes, while some dual nationals who are genuinely indifferent to their second citizenship may get unfairly barred from running for office, keeping out those who in any way aren't and can therefore be influenced by their second country's government is a touch more important. Again, I know it sucks for some people, but I really don't see any way to have it both ways.
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Politics and Government / Re: I didn't know Australia had second-class citizens
« Last post by dpareja on July 19, 2017, 02:00:00 am »
Having duel citizens in a position that involves dealing with foreign governments can create conflicts of interest. For example, were parliament to propose something that effects Canada in a negative way, then the Canadian government could use its control over the MP's Canadian citizenship and the privileges it grants in order to sway their vote. Basically, it's about making sure foreign governments don't have any undue leverage over our own.

Personally, I think it's quite reasonable. Far more so than an arbitrary age limit, for whatever that's worth.

So, as I mentioned, it's very hard to give up US citizenship. (Largely because the US taxes all its citizens, no matter where they live, and they have to make sure that people aren't giving up their citizenship to avoid the estate tax or something.)

So if someone happens to be born as a dual Australia-US citizen (born on US soil to Australian parents, say), they have two citizenships through no fault or choice of their own, the non-Australian citizenship being very hard to be rid of, but who was raised in Australia and has no memories of being in the US (say the mother went into unexpected labour while on vacation), you're fine with that person being ineligible to serve in Parliament?

Because to me, if a member of Parliament appears to be unduly influenced by having another citizenship, then that's an issue to be taken up with that member by his or her constituents, and, if it is not resolved to their satisfaction, that member can be voted out of office in the next election. (For that matter, I want to see recall legislation at all levels of government, so it would happen even sooner.) And if Parliament thinks it's an issue, they can vote to expel the member.

As for age limits, I think they're there as a "life experience" thing, but given modern society, I think it would be more valuable to have people with sound academic or professional credentials in those offices, regardless of age.
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Politics and Government / Re: Mr. Trump Goes to Washington
« Last post by Id82 on July 18, 2017, 11:33:06 pm »
I love how the GOP is trying to blame their ineptitude on the Democrats. You're the idiots with all of the power. You don't need the democrats to pass your dumb legislation, yet you somehow fail.
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Politics and Government / Re: I didn't know Australia had second-class citizens
« Last post by The_Queen on July 18, 2017, 11:06:35 pm »
Having duel citizens in a position that involves dealing with foreign governments can create conflicts of interest. For example, were parliament to propose something that effects Canada in a negative way, then the Canadian government could use its control over the MP's Canadian citizenship and the privileges it grants in order to sway their vote. Basically, it's about making sure foreign governments don't have any undue leverage over our own.

Personally, I think it's quite reasonable. Far more so than a arbitrary age limit, for whatever that's worth.

Hey, I for one have no problem with voting for dual-citizens. That is why I support the Russian-American Vladimir "Joe" Americanman for president in 2020



#FeelTheTurn
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Having duel citizens in a position that involves dealing with foreign governments can create conflicts of interest. For example, were parliament to propose something that effects Canada in a negative way, then the Canadian government could use its control over the MP's Canadian citizenship and the privileges it grants in order to sway their vote. Basically, it's about making sure foreign governments don't have any undue leverage over our own.

Personally, I think it's quite reasonable. Far more so than an arbitrary age limit, for whatever that's worth.
99
Politics and Government / Re: I didn't know Australia had second-class citizens
« Last post by dpareja on July 18, 2017, 09:24:58 pm »
Did you know you can't become a senator in Canada unless you are at least 30 years old? Shameful.

Did you know you can't become a senator in Argentina unless you are at least 30 years old? Shameful.

In all seriousness, I understand why the requirement was there initially, but I don't think it really needs to be there any more. I'd rather see something like requiring a graduate degree (or similar professional certification), with either that degree or an undergraduate degree from a Canadian university (but then I'm biased).

EDIT: And an age requirement is something that, barring unfortunate events, everybody will eventually attain; being natural-born (President of Argentina) is not; holding no other citizenships (Australian Parliament) is something that some people can't help (it's very hard to get rid of some countries' citizenships--I'm looking at you, USA).

EDIT #2: There are also property and net worth requirements for the Senate, but (excepting a technicality relating to Quebec) Parliament can do away with those by a simple majority vote should it wish to.
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Politics and Government / Re: I didn't know Australia had second-class citizens
« Last post by Sigmaleph on July 18, 2017, 09:17:05 pm »
Did you know you can't become a senator in Canada unless you are at least 30 years old? Shameful.
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