Author Topic: Texas is a word in Norwegian language  (Read 1614 times)

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Offline Askold

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Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« on: October 25, 2015, 08:37:52 am »
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34622478

Specifically it means "crazy." And before you ask, yes it is referring to the state in USA and it is not an coincidence.

Quote
It became part of the language when Norwegians started watching cowboy movies and reading Western literature, according to Daniel Gusfre Ims, the head of the advisory service at the Language Council of Norway.

"The genre was extremely popular in Norway, and a lot of it featured Texas, so the word became a symbol of something lawless and without control," he says.

Its first usage dates back to 1957, when it appeared in a novel by Vegard Vigerust called The Boy who wanted to buy Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. The author writes "he would make it even more texas in the village?".

Nowadays, the word is widespread all over Norway. It's frequently used in the phrase "helt texas" [completely crazy], which has appeared in Norwegian newspapers 50 times this year, he says.

I am appalled. They wasted a perfectly good word when they could have used "Florida" but I suppose Florida simply wasn't as famous (or possibly not as crazy) in the 50s.
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Offline guizonde

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2015, 08:43:58 am »
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34622478

Specifically it means "crazy." And before you ask, yes it is referring to the state in USA and it is not an coincidence.

Quote
It became part of the language when Norwegians started watching cowboy movies and reading Western literature, according to Daniel Gusfre Ims, the head of the advisory service at the Language Council of Norway.

"The genre was extremely popular in Norway, and a lot of it featured Texas, so the word became a symbol of something lawless and without control," he says.

Its first usage dates back to 1957, when it appeared in a novel by Vegard Vigerust called The Boy who wanted to buy Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. The author writes "he would make it even more texas in the village?".

Nowadays, the word is widespread all over Norway. It's frequently used in the phrase "helt texas" [completely crazy], which has appeared in Norwegian newspapers 50 times this year, he says.

I am appalled. They wasted a perfectly good word when they could have used "Florida" but I suppose Florida simply wasn't as famous (or possibly not as crazy) in the 50s.

florida is surrealistically weird. texas is pants-on-cowboy-hat crazy. i think it's a fitting match  ;D

my friends who've trouble rolling the english "r", rather than say "'murica" just yell out "texas, man!" in a thick southern drawl to the same effect.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2015, 10:52:06 am by guizonde »
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Offline mellenORL

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2015, 08:50:09 am »
Florida was considered glamorous and glorious from the 1920's on until the seventies. In the fifties Miami, Florida and Havana, Cuba were the western hemisphere's version of Monte Carlo and Biarritz.
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Offline rookie

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2015, 10:48:34 am »
Also I've found Florida to be a different kind of word than Texas. Florida teens to be the random eccentric weird. Americans tend to view Texans the same way the rest of the world views Americans. Pushy, loud, pointlessly proud of the geographic accident. Just ask a native Texan why Texas is so great and you'll see what I mean.
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Offline Ultimate Paragon

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2015, 11:34:39 am »
There are many different kinds of crazy.

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2015, 01:04:59 pm »
Also I've found Florida to be a different kind of word than Texas. Florida teens to be the random eccentric weird. Americans tend to view Texans the same way the rest of the world views Americans. Pushy, loud, pointlessly proud of the geographic accident. Just ask a native Texan why Texas is so great and you'll see what I mean.

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Offline Lt. Fred

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2015, 10:41:38 pm »
Two mountain lions met on a track. One was from Texas, the other from another part of the South.
The Texas mountain lion challenged the other mountain lion. Each would go to the other's patch and hunt for a season.
A season passed. The mountain lions returned. The Texan was hearty and well, the other just skin and bones. The Texan asked what the hell had happened.
"I have no idea," the other one said.
"I did everything you're supposed to. I laid in ambush on a track, waiting for a human to go by. Then I yelled and jumped on him and then ate him.
"But I never seemed to get any sustenance."
The other lion laughed uproariously for a few minutes.
"You fool!" he said.
"When you roared at him, you scared the piss out of him.
"Then when you jumped on him, you knocked the wind out of him.
"By the time you were eating, he was nothing but belt buckle."
Ultimate Paragon admits to fabricating a hit piece on Politico.

http://fqa.digibase.ca/index.php?topic=6936.0

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Offline guizonde

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2015, 12:23:17 am »
Two mountain lions met on a track. One was from Texas, the other from another part of the South.
The Texas mountain lion challenged the other mountain lion. Each would go to the other's patch and hunt for a season.
A season passed. The mountain lions returned. The Texan was hearty and well, the other just skin and bones. The Texan asked what the hell had happened.
"I have no idea," the other one said.
"I did everything you're supposed to. I laid in ambush on a track, waiting for a human to go by. Then I yelled and jumped on him and then ate him.
"But I never seemed to get any sustenance."
The other lion laughed uproariously for a few minutes.
"You fool!" he said.
"When you roared at him, you scared the piss out of him.
"Then when you jumped on him, you knocked the wind out of him.
"By the time you were eating, he was nothing but belt buckle."

but what about teh gunz? wuzn't he armed? he ain't no true texan (tm)!!

(still, cute story)
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Offline Damen

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2015, 01:25:00 am »
So, show of hands; is anyone surprised?
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Offline guizonde

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2015, 01:56:46 pm »
So, show of hands; is anyone surprised?

*crickets chirping*

uh, i think i see a slug kinda sorta raising its hand in the back...
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Offline Lt. Fred

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2015, 06:10:19 pm »
Two mountain lions met on a track. One was from Texas, the other from another part of the South.
The Texas mountain lion challenged the other mountain lion. Each would go to the other's patch and hunt for a season.
A season passed. The mountain lions returned. The Texan was hearty and well, the other just skin and bones. The Texan asked what the hell had happened.
"I have no idea," the other one said.
"I did everything you're supposed to. I laid in ambush on a track, waiting for a human to go by. Then I yelled and jumped on him and then ate him.
"But I never seemed to get any sustenance."
The other lion laughed uproariously for a few minutes.
"You fool!" he said.
"When you roared at him, you scared the piss out of him.
"Then when you jumped on him, you knocked the wind out of him.
"By the time you were eating, he was nothing but belt buckle."

but what about teh gunz? wuzn't he armed? he ain't no true texan (tm)!!

(still, cute story)

If you get the reference, a million points to you.
Ultimate Paragon admits to fabricating a hit piece on Politico.

http://fqa.digibase.ca/index.php?topic=6936.0

The party's name is the Democratic Party. It has been since 1830. Please spell correctly.

"The party must go wholly one way or wholly the other. It cannot face in both directions at the same time."
-FDR

Offline Askold

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2015, 09:05:25 am »
I give up, Texas wins...
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL3MxAH-kDI" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL3MxAH-kDI</a>


This guy is real. He is a lawyer. He is from TEXAS! He is the TEXAS LAW HAWK!

Also, his Facebook page and blog seem professional even if he has funny ads.

http://texaslawhawk.com/blog/
« Last Edit: October 28, 2015, 09:08:59 am by askold »
No matter what happens, no matter what my last words may end up being, I want everyone to claim that they were:
"If you strike me down, I shall become more powerful than you could possibly imagine."
Aww, you guys rock. :)  I feel the love... and the pitchforks and torches.  Tingly!

Offline mellenORL

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Re: Texas is a word in Norwegian language
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2015, 01:05:49 pm »
XD Better than Better Call Saul!- Rawr. I suspect he was a huge Colbert Report fan, too.
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