Author Topic: "Politicians can change the law..."  (Read 326 times)

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Offline Sigmaleph

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Re: "Politicians can change the law..."
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2018, 07:39:39 pm »
Are you arguing that mandatory reporting laws are useless becauase laws against the things being hypothetically reported on already exist including obstruction of justice and perjury?

I'm saying the specific argument "we need to get rid of privacy laws that apply to the Catholic Church because the Catholic Church has a bad track record with reporting crimes" makes no sense
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Offline Sigmaleph

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Re: "Politicians can change the law..."
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2018, 07:41:08 pm »
A significant fraction of the benefit of therapy is literally just talking to someone.
Sure, and if we're going to say that justifies not reporting something serious to the police, then it should apply to everyone, not just priests and therapists.

If everybody can claim privacy privileges  then you have an absolute defence against charges that you didn't report a crime. If it's only a handful of people under specific situations then you don't.

Indeed. That's why I would argue that privacy privileges should only apply to people who are uniquely capable of making a positive difference. Hence why doctors and therapists and the like get it, while priests do not.

I think that's a plausible argument, and it's clearly not the one being used by people who want a child abuse exception rather than getting rid of priest-penitent privilege entirely.
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Offline Tolpuddle Martyr

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Re: "Politicians can change the law..."
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2018, 10:03:26 pm »
Are you arguing that mandatory reporting laws are useless becauase laws against the things being hypothetically reported on already exist including obstruction of justice and perjury?

I'm saying the specific argument "we need to get rid of privacy laws that apply to the Catholic Church because the Catholic Church has a bad track record with reporting crimes" makes no sense
I agree that laws shouldn't be levelled against one religipus group or body, I just think thst laws seperate from obstruction and perjury aimed at specifically those professions whp work with children make sense. It provides an additional incentive for reporting and sets up a framework for assessing these claims.

Offline Sigmaleph

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Re: "Politicians can change the law..."
« Reply #18 on: July 09, 2018, 06:34:03 pm »
Are you arguing that mandatory reporting laws are useless becauase laws against the things being hypothetically reported on already exist including obstruction of justice and perjury?

I'm saying the specific argument "we need to get rid of privacy laws that apply to the Catholic Church because the Catholic Church has a bad track record with reporting crimes" makes no sense
I agree that laws shouldn't be levelled against one religipus group or body, I just think thst laws seperate from obstruction and perjury aimed at specifically those professions whp work with children make sense. It provides an additional incentive for reporting and sets up a framework for assessing these claims.

I think there could be relevant useful laws to that effect (I also think the default reaction will be shitty laws that invade people's privacy under the excuse that they might be child molesters and that won't help the problem at all).
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Offline Tolpuddle Martyr

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Re: "Politicians can change the law..."
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2018, 08:10:23 pm »
I agree that tossing someone under the bus whose done, or perhaps even contemplated nothing wrong is manifestly unjust at the same time onlookers who suspect wrongdoing aren't investigators and waiting until they are absolutely certain before contacting proefessional investigators to determine if wrongdoing occurs can also lead to gross miscarriages of justice particularly when lack of certainty can be abused as a convenient alibi. It's thorny, I don't know what the right balance is.